news, news

Wow.

It’s been over an entire year since I last blogged.

I won’t go into the details (they aren’t juicy, anyhow) but Life Happened, and blogging (and writing) fell by the wayside.

But things haven’t been completely dead, hence this post.

Entangled did come out, and you can find it on Amazon, B&N, and Smashwords.

My short story, “Trading Gifts”, was published in Sword & Sorceress 28. This was a milestone for me! I have fond memories of devouring these anthologies as a teen.

S&S 28

Also, my short story, “The Village of No Women” recently came out in Phantazein, an anthology of fables, fairy tales, and folklore with a twist, edited by Tehani Wessely of FableCroft Publishing. Look at that absolutely gorgeous cover!

PhantazeinCover

Quartz is still being serialized. The eighty third episode went live today. We have 4 more episodes to go before the end, all of which are scheduled! If this is the first you’re hearing about this project, check out its page. You can catch up on all the episodes there.

I hope–crosses fingers–to be more active on the blog from here on out!

Cover Reveal: Entangled

Entangled--Broken Fairy Tales

A foster mother is torn between loyalty to the sea-girl she raised and the people she left so long ago. A runaway daughter receives help from her mother’s love reaching across the sea. A woman who lost everything to a curse of thorns is given another chance to love. 

Entangled: Broken Fairy Tales explores the relationships between mothers and daughters in three short stories.

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I’m thrilled to share the cover of my newest broken fairy tales anthology, Entangled. The wonderful Robin Cornett (who designed the covers for Shattered and Wired) did an awesome job with this one. This time around, I wanted to move away from the monochromatic look of the other two covers while still retaining series elements (ie: the fonts). I’m so pleased with the result!

Entangled is almost ready to go live. I’ll be announcing its release here (of course) and also in my newsletter, which you should totally subscribe to, for three very good reasons:

  • Bonus Content (This newsletter’s bonus content is another broken fairy tale called The Bargain, in which the Rumpelstiltskin story ends differently from what you know).
  • Coupons
  • Giveaways

I also promise to never ever ever sell or give away your email address (I hate unsolicited email just as much as you do!) and my emails will be short, sweet, and infrequent. Just use the form below to sign up (check the newsletter box).

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WANAFriday: a new-to-me author

This week’s #wanafriday blog prompt is: Share something cool that you’ve recently discovered with your blog readers. This could be a great book, a gripping TV show, a neat tip, an awesome recipe, or something else!

Many moons ago, I was waxing nostalgic about M. M. Kaye’s Death In… mysteries and bemoaning the fact that she’d only written six of them and I’d read them all. A blog reader (perhaps it was the lovely Ellen Gregory?) suggested I try Mary Stewart’s mysteries.

Now, I’d only ever heard of Mary Stewart because of her Merlin trilogy. I’d no idea she’d written romantic suspense (back before there was such a genre). Wanting to fill the Kaye-shaped hole in my reading life, I picked up her Airs Above the Ground.

And was hooked.

In short order, I tore through The Moonspinners, The Gabriel Hounds and My Brother Michael. I appreciate Stewart’s wonderfully evocative descriptions of her setting and her attention to details of the natural world. I enjoy her courageous heroines and her very manly men. It’s also interesting to note the way attitudes have changed over time, even in something as small and simple as the fact that people in her books smoke like chimneys!

I’m delighted to have discovered Mary Stewart’s mysteries and happy to recommend them to you. If you enjoyed Kaye’s Death In… books, you’re in for a treat with these!

 

Check out other people’s recent discoveries:

evenings with Jane Austen

Earlier this summer, I was on a Jane Austen kick (we’d just got back from a busy vacation and were dealing with sickness–and all I wanted were cosy, comfort reads or films).

Persuasion

Persuasion

My first Jane Austen craving was a desire to re-watch the 1995 Persuasion adaptation, starring Amanda Root. I’ve also watched the 2007 adaptation, which is shorter and disappointed me greatly by leaving out my favorite line from the book. Really, how else are you going to persuade Sir Elliot to rent Kellynch Hall to the Crofts without pointing out that a married lady with no children is a great preserver of furniture? The later adaptation also had Anne running amok all over Bath (that is so not Austen), but the Captain Wentworth was more handsome and broody. Trade-offs, trade-offs.

But handsomeness of actors aside, I prefer the older Persuasion which remains truer to the book (save in their portrayal of Helen Smith and their completely changing Mr. Elliot’s motivations for courting Anne) and in spite of Amanda Root’s deer-in-the-headlights look for far too much of the movie.

Then I re-read the book, and was reminded again what a hard role Anne Elliot is to play. Anne is a quiet woman, with an understated manner. She’s past her bloom, yet has enough delicate prettiness to attract attention. She is not a type of heroine who’s found a lot in modern books and movies.  It’s a lot easier to play spunky Elizabeth Bennet than it is to play an Anne Eliot with her elegant mind and sweet characterwithout making her look like a doormat.

Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

In the case of Sense and Sensibility I confess to loving the 2008 adaptation more than the book itself (shocking, I know!). The rather bland leading men of the book are rounded out and made more heroic in the movie. Colonel Brandon is not the relic of the book, but honorable, mature, active and attractive. Edward Ferrars is played engagingly by twinkle-eyed Dan Stevens (Matthew from Downton Abbey). Marianne’s histrionics over the loss of Willoughby are downplayed in the movie without losing any of the emotion. Elinor Dashwood remains an admirable, common-sensical young woman. And the adaptation does a fine job of putting the Dashwoods’ new cottage right on the cliffs with the wild wonderful sea as the backdrop. The location is absolutely stunning.

(I also much prefer this adaptation to the more famous Emma Thompson/Kate Winslet movie.)

Northanger Abbey

Northanger Abbey

I watched Masterpiece Theater’s Northanger Abbey for the first time, and found movie kinder to the characters than the book itself. Austen does not seem to really like her characters very much, which is off-putting to me as the reader. The movie deals much more gently with the romantic-minded Catherine Morland and the love that Henry Tilney bears for her (in spite of his disinheritance by his formidably snobbish father).

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Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Mansfield Park did not make it on to my reading and watching lists for various reasons. Right now, P&P suffers–in my mind–too much from over-exposure. I’ve never cared much for Emma and what I vaguely remember of the Gwyneth Paltrow movie seemed too contemporary (in attitude) for my tastes. I despised poor Fanny Price when I read Mansfield Park as a young teen–I suspect I’d be kinder to her today.

What is your favorite Austen book and/or adaptation?

Daisy Yellow zine giveaway winners

I shook the magic random number generator, and the winners of Daisy Yellow Zine #8 are…

*drumroll*

S. M. Hutchins and kort!

Congratulations, winners. Tammy will be contacting you shortly.